Blog Post

Section of The AIDS Memorial Quilt coming to PCA Nov. 20 to Dec. 4

A growing number of older adults are living with HIV/AIDS. In Philadelphia, 52 percent of people living with AIDS are 50-plus. To draw attention to the HIV/AIDS epidemic and to commemorate a former PCA employee who died of AIDS, a 12-by-12-foot section of The AIDS Memorial Quilt was installed at PCA on Nov. 20 and will remain on display through Dec. 4. The timing of the display coincides with World AIDS Day on Dec. 1. The Quilt block contains eight panels and is being displayed in partnership with AIDS Fund. It includes a panel created by Daniel Yoffee in memory of his twin brother, former PCA Communications Associate Alan Yoffee, who died of AIDS in 1992.

A welcome ceremony will be held at PCA on Monday, Nov. 20 at 1 p.m. The public is welcome. The ceremony will include remarks by Holly Lange, PCA president and CEO; Robb Reichard, AIDS Fund executive director; and Daniel Yoffee. The AIDS Memorial Quilt provides a creative means for remembrance, illustrates the enormity of the AIDS epidemic, and increases the general public’s awareness of HIV/AIDS.

As a PCA communications associate (1990-92), Alan Yoffee publicized the agency’s programs and services which benefit Philadelphia’s older adults. He also helped to develop and promote PCA special events, like the former “Senior Center Smokeout,” held in Philadelphia in conjunction with the American Cancer Society’s “Great American Smokeout.” He was instrumental in raising thousands of dollars for PCA’s Emergency Fund for Older Philadelphians which benefits low-income seniors in crisis. “Alan used to say that his job at PCA was a dream come true. He said it was hard to believe that he got paid for a job he enjoyed doing so much,” Daniel Yoffee said.

A native of Orangeburg, New York, Alan Yoffee moved to Philadelphia to attend Temple University and remained in the city to work as a journalist, publicist and AIDS activist. In addition to his work with PCA, he served as a publicist for a variety of arts organizations and was a freelance journalist for the News of Delaware County, the Advocate, the former Philadelphia City Paper and other publications.

According to AIDS Fund, The AIDS Memorial Quilt provides a creative means for remembrance, illustrates the enormity of the AIDS epidemic, and increases the general public’s awareness of HIV/AIDS. More than 50,000 3-by-6 foot memorial panels – most commemorating the life of someone who has died of AIDS – have been sewn together by friends, lovers and family, or loved ones.